Tag Archives: Lenore Taylor

Feb 15, 1995 – the Fin briefly understands Jevons’ Paradox

Having helped defeat a proposed carbon tax, the Australian Financial Review steps back for a minute and looks at the bigger picture. In an editorial published on February 15 1995, it momentarily groks Jevons paradox.

“But no-regrets policies cannot be counted on to significantly reduce Australia’s total greenhouse emissions. The reason is that making the economy more efficient and competitive will lead to higher levels of output.”

Also on this day

Diesendorf, M. 2006. Muzzling of CSIRO scientists is part of a wider campaign.  The Canberra Times 15 February.

ABC TV’s Four Corners program and especially its reporter, Janine Cohen, should be congratulated on highlighting an undemocratic practice that has been going on for decades: the muzzling of CSIRO scientists from participating in public debate about greenhouse response strategies and energy alternatives….

and

 

Taylor, L. 2011. Time to knuckle down to make a choice, before it’s too late. The Age, 15 February.

For a decade the main parties in Australian politics have been choosing expensive, dumb policies to reduce greenhouse emissions over the cheap, smart option of an efficiently designed carbon price.

They’ve consciously picked ideas that cost 10 times more than the cheapest option of a carbon price, which they have repeatedly promised, only to change their minds.

and

Green, M. 2013. Bursting the carbon bubble. The Age,15 February, p.16.

Energy analysts and activists warn that most of the world’s fossil fuels must remain in the ground, and that it can’t be business as usual for the industry.

Jan 19, 2016- outgoing chief scientist says tougher greenhouse targets inevitable

Hmm, at some point I will write on the history of chief scientists and climate change in Australia – it is an interesting tale, dating all the way back to the first one, in the late 1980s…
But for now; on this day a year ago, the estimable Lenore Taylor reported that the outgoing chief scientist, Ian Chubb, reckoned that tougher emissions targets were inevitable [in the long run, perhaps – but in the long run, as Keynes said….] and that “hostility towards climate science may be easing but scientists still have a duty to offer unflinching advice.”

Taylor, L. 2016.Outgoing chief scientist Ian Chubb says tougher greenhouse gas targets inevitable. The Guardian, 19 January.

Meanwhile, 24 years previously,  on 19th January 1992, Dr Graeme Pearman, then co-ordinator of the CSIRO’s climate change research program said that there was little doubt that climate change (or to be more specific  what we nowadays call anthropogenic global warming)  was a reality and that those doubting it were gambling with the future of the world.

Well, Pearman went on to head the CSIRO’s Atmospheric Research Division, before finally succumbing to the horror that was the Howard government’s attitude to climate science (more on that later).

Anon,  1992. Greenhouse cynics gambling with future. Canberra Times, 20 January.