Tag Archives: Climate Institute

May 13, 2011 – “Say Yes” (to what?) campaign launched

So, bruised and bloodied from the CPRS debacle, the established Big Green groups decided they should get behind the next version of an emissions trading scheme. ON this day in 2011, six very very long years ago, the Climate Institute sent out a press release about the ‘Say Yes’ campaign…

Also on this day –

Twenty-five years ago today two more industry commissioned studies say the sky will fall if so much as one lump of coal is not burnt….

1992  Brown, B. 1992. Pressure builds on Aust over greenhouse emissions. Australian Financial Review, 14 May, p.11.

Australia may come under pressure to sign a declaration to stabilise greenhouse gas emissions, although a convention adopted at a United Nations meeting in New York last weekend set no target.

Developing and European nations that could achieve stabilisation of greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels by the year 2000 are expected to push for this target at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in June.

A United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Control agreed last weekend on a text to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but without a specific target. The target will be considered by member governments before the Rio meeting.

But to reach the stabilisation target, Australia would need “excessively stringent government intervention”, according to one of two industry-commissioned studies released yesterday.

The studies, prepared by the Canberra-based economic consultants ACIL Australia and Swan Consultants for the Business Council of Australia, said advice to the Government had seriously underestimated the economic costs of stabilising greenhouse emissions.

May 7, 2014- Business Council loses status with WBCSD…

The Climate Institute (soon to be RIP), got the boot stuck into the BCA on this day three years ago.

The Business Council of Australia’s loss of status with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development is unsurprising as the BCA has displayed a remarkable lack of policy consistency over recent years.

Its position appears to be driven more by short-termism than a thorough assessment of the economic risks to Australia of further global warming. This lack of concern is particularly disturbing as Australia is more exposed to climate change than any other developed country. We are already experiencing the economic and human impacts of the less than one degree warming to date and these costs will rise.  Global warming above two degrees exceeds the adaptive capacity of many Australian industries.

Also on this day-

1992 Dr Hewson captured the full flavour of the initiative in a speech to the Australian Mining Industry Council annual dinner on May 7, 1992, when he described it as sustainable development with a capital D. This move is really an exercise in fast-tracking, with an absolute limit of 12 months on government processes of evaluation, failing which the project gets automatic go-ahead.

This is dangerous, based as it is on the assumption that red, black or green tape is simply frustrating developments, rather than complex issues being carefully evaluated. There is also a quite dishonest attempt to list a long list of stalled projects without acknowledging that many had not proceeded for commercial reasons.

Toyne, P. 1993. Environment forgotten in the race to the Lodge. Canberra Times, 8 March p. 11.

2002  Howarth, I. 2002. Report card on mining industry to be unveiled. Australian Financial Review, 7 May, p. 14.

The Australian mining industry still has a long way to go in its quest for sustainable development, but a major report on the sector has found it has made considerable progress in meeting its social and environmental obligations.

WMC chief executive, Hugh Morgan, will today unveil the Facing the Future report, which investigated the Australian mining industry as part of the Global Mining Initiative undertaken by the world’s biggest miners.

 

2015: Reef plans based on fact not NGO fiction Statement by Queensland Resources Council Chief Executive Michael Roche

Today we welcome the announcements from federal and state governments who are getting on with job of dealing with the top priority issues affecting the Great Barrier Reef.
The Queensland Government’s Minister for the Great Barrier Reef Steven Miles has announced the creation of a new taskforce of experts to improve the reef’s water quality, which will be led by the state’s chief scientist Dr Geoff Garrett.

April 16, 2008 – Clean Coal to the rescue?

On this day 9 years ago t he Australian Coal Association, the Construction Forestry Mining Energy Union, the Climate Institute and World Wildlife Fund called on the Federal Government to establish a National Carbon Capture and Storage Taskforce to combat climate change… [to] be charged with developing and implementing a nationally coordinated plan to oversee rapid demonstration and commercialisation of 10,000 GWh of carbon capture and storage (CCS) electricity per year by 2020.”

april162008

 

Also on this day- 

1980 The Age ‘Ecology is endangered’ article quoting William Kellogg

2007 In an interview with the ABC’s Four Corners in April 200[7], the Industry Minister, Senator Ian Macfarlane described State incentive schemes such as VRET as ‘Mickey Mouse schemes.’ (Prest, 2007: 254)