Tag Archives: Bernard Keane

June 1, 2008 – Liberals demand solar panel action, via skydiving stunt

Bernard Keane, a journo with Crikey, wrote a great piece in 2010, while Environment Minister Peter ‘Midnight Oil’ Garrett was getting pilloried in the media (The Rudd caravan’s wheels were beginning to fall off). Keane pointed out that some of Garrett’s critics had been saying different things less than two years previously.  One of those critics, Greg Hunt, would be Environment Minister under Tony Abbott and Malcolm Turnbull..

Oddly, this is the Greg Hunt who throughout 2008 opportunistically joined the Greens in bagging Garrett for not rolling the solar panels program out quickly enough, after Garrett introduced a means test on the solar panel rebate to slow the remarkable demand for the program.  In June 2008, Hunt went skydiving — anyone remember that? — to demonstrate that the solar industry was in “freefall — but unlike me it doesn’t have a soft landing ahead of it”.

And here is more info-

Shadow minister throws himself out of a plane

2008 06 01 hunt plane

 

 

 

 

March 17, 2011 – Hewson says ‘Direct Action’ has (high) implicit carbon price

So this is how bizarre 2011 was.  Both Labor and the Coalition agreed they would act to reduce Australian emissions 5% by 2020.  The Labor lot, allegedly socialist, were going to use market mechanisms. The Coalition, ostensibly in favour of ‘free markets’ were going to us… an expensive government-funded set of incentives and regulations known (for the lulz) as ‘Direct Action.’ Yeah, go figure, #worldturnedupsidedown. In this context former Liberal leader John Hewson (the one who had refused to meet with Australian Conservation Foundation, back in 1992) explained to ABC’s Lateline “how direct action includes an implicit carbon price which is far higher than an ETS.” [At least according to this timeline by Labor’s Mark Butler MP. But the link provided goes through to a Garnaut interview!]

Also on this day-

Thorne, G. 2006. Carbon capture the key to cutting greenhouse gases.  Australian Financial Review, 17 March.- “Australia has the opportunity and responsibility to explore emissions-reduction technologies,” writes Grant Thorne, (managing director of Rio Tinto Coal Australia.)

2009 Bernard Keane’s excellent report on the Heartland Institute’s conference.  Really worth a read!