Jan 5, 2006: “Our Drowning Neighbours” report shows Australia says it cares

jan52006On January 5th 2006 the then Federal Labor MP Bob Sercombe and current MP Anthony Albanese issued Our Drowning Neighbours, Labor’s Policy Discussion Paper on Climate Change in the Pacific, with the goal of generating a more proactive, strategic approach.

Context: The Association of Small Island States was formed in 1990 at the second World Climate Conference in Geneva. Various nations had already spotted that sea level rise was going to be a bit of a problem for them. Initially (in the late 80s and early 90s) it looked like Australia and New Zealand were going to be responsible hegemons. But that optimism faded before John Howard became Australian Prime Minister in 1996 (see Jeremy Leggett’s “The Carbon War”, page 166-7 for an example of this).
And during the brief Labor interregnum of 2007 to 2013, coal exports from Australia were not discussed. Which leads to protests like these
.

As ever, see the disclaimers, help the project and comments policy.

Leggett, J. (2001) The Carbon War: Global Warming and the End of the Oil Era. London: Penguin

See also:

Leckie, S, Simperingham, E. and Bakker, J. (2012) Climate Change and Displacement Reader. London: Routledge

van Herpen, C. (2013) Climate change displacement and the need for pre-emptive managed migration Friends of the Earth Australia

Other things that happened on this day:

1989 The US National Academy of Sciences urge President George Bush to take this climate thing seriously
2006 James Hansen interviewed by 60 minutes.  (Bowen Censoring Science p. 55)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s